Discretionary medical reporting of potentially unfit drivers: a questionnaire-based survey in Southeast Switzerland

Eggert, Sebastian; Thali, Michael J; Pfäffli, Matthias (2012). Discretionary medical reporting of potentially unfit drivers: a questionnaire-based survey in Southeast Switzerland. International journal of legal medicine, 126(1), pp. 71-8. Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00414-011-0574-5

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In Switzerland, every physician has the right to report a patient that is potentially unfit to drive to the licensing authority without violating medical confidentiality. Verified information regarding physicians' attitudes concerning this discretionary reporting and the frequency of such reports are not available. In order to answer these questions, 635 resident physicians were sent a questionnaire. The response rate was 52%. On average, the responding physicians--for all specialties--reported 0.31 patients (SD 0.64, 95% CI 0.24-0.38) in the year before the survey and 1.00 patient (SD 1.74, 95% CI 0.81-1.20) in the past 5 years. Seventy-nine percent of the responding physicians indicated knowing the current legal requirements for driving in Switzerland. In applied logistic regression analysis, only two factors correlate significantly with reporting: male sex (odds ratio 5.4) and the specialty "general medicine" (odds ratio 3.4). Ninety-seven percent of the physicians were against abolishing medical discretionary reporting and 29% were in favor of introducing mandatory reporting. The great majority of the questioned physicians supported the discretionary reporting of drivers that are potentially unfit to drive as currently practiced in Switzerland. The importance and the necessity of a regular traffic medicine-related continuing education for medical professionals are shown by the low number of reports per physician.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Traffic Medicine, Psychiatry and Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Pfäffli, Matthias

ISSN:

0937-9827

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:10

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 21:46

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00414-011-0574-5

PubMed ID:

21534006

Web of Science ID:

000299091400010

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.1678

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1678 (FactScience: 203552)

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