Mycobacterial infection aggravates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric preneoplastic pathology by redirection of de novo induced Treg cells.

Artola-Borán, Mariela; Fallegger, Angela; Priola, Martina; Jeske, Rima; Waterboer, Tim; Dohlman, Anders B; Shen, Xiling; Wild, Sebastian; He, Jiazhuo; Levesque, Mitchell P; Yousefi, Shida; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Cheng, Phil F; Müller, Anne (2022). Mycobacterial infection aggravates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric preneoplastic pathology by redirection of de novo induced Treg cells. Cell reports, 38(6), p. 110359. Cell Press 10.1016/j.celrep.2022.110359

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The two human pathogens Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) co-exist in many geographical areas of the world. Here, using a co-infection model of H. pylori and the Mtb relative M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we show that both bacteria affect the colonization and immune control of the respective other pathogen. Co-occurring M. bovis boosts gastric Th1 responses and H. pylori control and aggravates gastric immunopathology. H. pylori in the stomach compromises immune control of M. bovis in the liver and spleen. Prior antibiotic H. pylori eradication or M. bovis-specific immunization reverses the effects of H. pylori. Mechanistically, the mutual effects can be attributed to the redirection of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) to sites of M. bovis infection. Reversal of Treg cell redirection by CXCR3 blockade restores M. bovis control. In conclusion, the simultaneous presence of both pathogens exacerbates the problems associated with each individual infection alone and should possibly be factored into treatment decisions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology

UniBE Contributor:

Yousefi, Shida and Simon, Hans-Uwe

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2211-1247

Publisher:

Cell Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Celine Joray

Date Deposited:

29 Mar 2022 17:15

Last Modified:

03 Apr 2022 01:56

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.celrep.2022.110359

PubMed ID:

35139377

Uncontrolled Keywords:

bacterial persistence gastric cancer granuloma mutual interaction of pathogenic bacteria mycobacterial infection

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/167886

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/167886

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