Serum Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine Concentrations in Sepsis: Secondary Analysis of the Swiss Pediatric Sepsis Study.

Equey, Lucile; Agyeman, Philipp K A; Veraguth, Rosemarie; Rezzi, Serge; Schlapbach, Luregn J; Giannoni, Eric (2022). Serum Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine Concentrations in Sepsis: Secondary Analysis of the Swiss Pediatric Sepsis Study. Pediatric critical care medicine, 23(5), pp. 390-394. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/PCC.0000000000002911

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OBJECTIVES

To determine circulating levels of ascorbic acid (VitC) and thiamine (VitB1) in neonates and children with blood culture-proven sepsis.

DESIGN

Nested single-center study of neonates and children prospectively included in the Swiss Pediatric Sepsis Study.

SETTING

One tertiary care academic hospital.

PATIENTS

Sixty-one neonates and children 0-16 years old.

INTERVENTIONS

None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

VitC and VitB1 were quantified in serum of patients (median age, 10.5 mo; interquartile range [IQR], 0.5-62.1 mo) with blood culture-proven sepsis. Median time between sepsis onset and sampling for measurement of vitamins was 3 days (IQR, 2-4 d). Median serum levels of VitC and VitB1 were 32.4 μmol/L (18.9-53.3 μmol/L) and 22.5 nmol/L (12.6-82 nmol/L); 36% of the patients (22/61) had low VitC and 10% (6/61) had VitC deficiency; and 72% (44/61) had low VitB1 and 13% (8/61) had VitB1 deficiency. Children with low VitC were older (p = 0.007) and had higher C-reactive protein (p = 0.004) compared with children with VitC within the normal range. Children with low VitB1 levels were older (p = 0.0009) and were less frequently receiving enteral or parenteral vitamin supplementation (p = 0.0000003) compared with children with normal VitB1 levels.

CONCLUSIONS

In this cohort of newborns and children with sepsis, low and deficient VitC and VitB1 levels were frequently observed. Age, systemic inflammation, and vitamin supplementation were associated with vitamin levels during sepsis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Paediatric Infectiology

UniBE Contributor:

Agyeman, Philipp Kwame Abayie

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1529-7535

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Anette van Dorland

Date Deposited:

19 May 2022 09:39

Last Modified:

20 Jul 2022 16:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/PCC.0000000000002911

PubMed ID:

35583617

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/170111

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/170111

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