Is living in a household with children associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity in adults? Results from the Swiss national seroprevalence study Corona Immunitas.

Blankenberger, Jacob; Kaufmann, Marco; Albanese, Emiliano; Amati, Rebecca; Anker, Daniela; Camerini, Anne-Linda; Chocano-Bedoya, Patricia; Cullati, Stéphane; Cusini, Alexia; Fehr, Jan; Harju, Erika; Kohler, Philipp; Kriemler, Susi; Michel, Gisela; Rodondi, Nicolas; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves; Speierer, Alexandre; Tancredi, Stefano; Puhan, Milo A and Kahlert, Christian R (2022). Is living in a household with children associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity in adults? Results from the Swiss national seroprevalence study Corona Immunitas. BMC medicine, 20(1), p. 233. BioMed Central 10.1186/s12916-022-02431-z

[img]
Preview
Text
Blankenberger2022_Article_IsLivingInAHouseholdWithChildr.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (2MB) | Preview

BACKGROUND

We aimed to determine whether living in a household with children is associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity in adults and investigated interacting factors that may influence this association.

METHODS

SARS-CoV-2 serology testing was performed in randomly selected individuals from the general population between end of October 2020 and February 2021 in 11 cantons in Switzerland. Data on sociodemographic and household characteristics, employment status, and health-related history was collected using questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association of living with children <18 years of age (number, age group) and SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. Further, we assessed the influence of reported non-household contacts, employment status, and gender.

RESULTS

Of 2393 working age participants (18-64 years), 413 (17.2%) were seropositive. Our results suggest that living with children and SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity are likely to be associated (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.22, 95% confidence interval [0.98-1.52], adjusted OR 1.25 [0.99-1.58]). A pattern of a positive association was also found for subgroups of children aged 0-11 years (OR 1.21 [0.90-1.60]) and 12-17 years (OR 1.14 [0.78-1.64]). Odds of seropositivity were higher with more children (OR 1.14 per additional child [1.02-1.27]). Men had higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection when living with children than women (interaction: OR 1.74 [1.10-2.76]).

CONCLUSIONS

In adults from the general population living with children seems associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. However, child-related infection risk is not the same for every subgroup and depends on factors like gender. Further factors determining child-related infection risk need to be identified and causal links investigated.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN18181860 .

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of General Internal Medicine (DAIM) > Clinic of General Internal Medicine > Centre of Competence for General Internal Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Chocano Bedoya, Patricia Orializ; Rodondi, Nicolas and Speierer, Alexandre Léonard

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1741-7015

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pubmed Import

Date Deposited:

22 Jun 2022 12:13

Last Modified:

23 Jun 2022 13:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12916-022-02431-z

PubMed ID:

35725472

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Antibody COVID-19 Children Household SARS-CoV-2 Serology

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/170808

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/170808

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback