The (In)Ability of a Multi-Stakeholder Platform to Address Land Conflicts—Lessons Learnt from an Oil Palm Landscape in Myanmar

Lundsgaard-Hansen, Lara M.; Oberlack, Christoph; Hunt, Glenn; Schneider, Flurina (2022). The (In)Ability of a Multi-Stakeholder Platform to Address Land Conflicts—Lessons Learnt from an Oil Palm Landscape in Myanmar. Land, 11(8), p. 1348. MDPI 10.3390/land11081348

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Oil palm landscapes are often characterised by land conflicts. Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSP) may be a promising means to contribute to conflict resolution. However, the merits of MSPs are limited in contexts with strong power imbalances and entrenched conflict histories. This study analyses an MSP from Myanmar. We developed an analytical framework based on literature on MSPs and social learning and used qualitative methods such as participatory observation and interviews. The study investigates how the MSP was designed and governed and whether it was effective in addressing the land conflicts around oil palm concessions. The study discusses several promising factors of the MSP for being effective, such as adequate inclusion of stakeholders, secured resources, or effective facilitation. However, the analysis also reveals how hindering factors such as lack of a clear mandate, goal, and decision-making competences of the MSP, insufficient communication, or lack of legal and land governance expertise contributed to only limited effectiveness of the MSP. Further, we discuss whether the MSP was a suitable approach in the given context of nontransparent land governance mechanisms, persisting power disparities, and longstanding conflict history. We conclude that designing and governing an MSP in such a context needs to be done very cautiously—if at all—and recommend paying special attention to ten specific points.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography > Unit Climatology
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Physical Geography
10 Strategic Research Centers > Centre for Development and Environment (CDE)

Graduate School:

International Graduate School North-South (IGS North-South)

UniBE Contributor:

Lundsgaard-Hansen, Lara; Oberlack, Christoph; Hunt, Glenn and Schneider, Flurina

ISSN:

2073-445X

Publisher:

MDPI

Projects:

[1047] Managing Telecoupled Landscapes for Sustainable Provision of Ecosystem Services and Poeverty Alleviation
[1723] OneMap Myanmar (Inception and Phase I)
[803] Cluster: Land Resources
[805] Sustainability Governance

Language:

English

Submitter:

Melchior Peter Nussbaumer

Date Deposited:

20 Oct 2022 07:57

Last Modified:

05 Dec 2022 16:26

Publisher DOI:

10.3390/land11081348

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/173921

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/173921

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