Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in mixed lymphocyte reaction affects glucose influx and enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis in alloreactive T-cells

Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Yiannaki, Efi; Markala, Dimitra; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis (2013). Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in mixed lymphocyte reaction affects glucose influx and enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis in alloreactive T-cells. Human immunology, 74(12), pp. 1501-1509. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier

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Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) suppresses adaptive immunity. T-cell proliferation and differentiation to effector cells require increased glucose consumption, aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis. The effect of IDO on the above metabolic pathways was evaluated in alloreactive T-cells. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor, 1-DL-methyl-tryptophane (1-MT), was used. In MLRs, 1-MT decreased tryptophan consumption, increased cell proliferation, glucose influx and lactate production, whereas it decreased tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. In T-cells, from the two pathways that could sense tryptophan depletion, i.e. general control nonrepressed 2 (GCN2) kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, 1-MT reduced only the activity of the GCN2 kinase. Additionally 1-MT treatment of MLRs altered the expression and/or the phosphorylation state of glucose transporter-1 and of key enzymes involved in glucose metabolism and glutaminolysis in alloreactive T-cells in a way that favors glucose influx, aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Thus in alloreactive T-cells, IDO through activation of the GCN2 kinase, decreases glucose influx and alters key enzymes involved in metabolism, decreasing aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Acting in such a way, IDO could be considered as a constraining factor for alloreactive T-cell proliferation and differentiation to effector T-cell subtypes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Nephrology and Hypertension

UniBE Contributor:

Arampatzis, Spyridon

ISSN:

0198-8859

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:42

Last Modified:

08 Jun 2016 10:36

PubMed ID:

23993986

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/17465 (FactScience: 225245)

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