TSE surveillance in small ruminants and pigs: a pilot study

Köfler, M; Seuberlich, Torsten; Maurer, E; Heim, D; Doherr, Marcus; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Botteron, Catherine (2006). TSE surveillance in small ruminants and pigs: a pilot study. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 148(7), 341-2, 344. Bern: Huber 10.1024/0036-7281.148.7.341

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Switzerland is controlling Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) in cattle (BSE) and small ruminants (scrapie). Since BSE is potentially transmissible to sheep, goats or pigs through feeding of contaminated meat and bone meal, implementation of an active surveillance programme for TSE in these species is discussed. The aim of this pilot study was to obtain preliminary data on the prevalence ofTSE and other neurological disorders in these populations. For that purpose, a total of 398 perished and 825 slaughtered adult small ruminants and pigs was examined for the presence of neuropathological changes. None of these animals revealed positive for TSE. However, the investigations demonstrated that perished sheep and goats exhibited a higher prevalence of relevant neuropathological changes when compared with slaughtered animals. From these results, it is concluded that perished small ruminants are probably a risk population for TSE and should be considered as target populations for an active surveillance programme.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DVK - Clinical Research (discontinued)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Seuberlich, Torsten; Doherr, Marcus; Zurbriggen, Andreas and Botteron, Catherine

ISSN:

0036-7281

Publisher:

Huber

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

16 Feb 2015 14:26

Publisher DOI:

10.1024/0036-7281.148.7.341

PubMed ID:

16888920

Web of Science ID:

000239944000004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18628 (FactScience: 829)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback