Redundancy and recombination in the Echinococcus AgB multigene family: is there any similarity with protozoan contingency genes?

Haag, K L; Gottstein, B; Müller, N; Schnorr, A; Ayala, F J (2006). Redundancy and recombination in the Echinococcus AgB multigene family: is there any similarity with protozoan contingency genes? Parasitology, 133(Pt 4), pp. 411-9. London: Cambridge University Press 10.1017/S0031182006000564

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Numerous genetic variants of the Echinococcus antigen B (AgB) are encountered within a single metacestode. This could be a reflection of gene redundancy or the result of a somatic hypermutation process. We evaluate the complexity of the AgB multigene family by characterizing the upstream promoter regions of the 4 already known genes (EgAgB1-EgAgB4) and evaluating their redundancy in the genome of 3 Echinococcus species (E. granulosus, E. ortleppi and E. multilocularis) using PCR-based approaches. We have ascertained that the number of AgB gene copies is quite variable, both within and between species. The most repetitive gene seems to be AgB3, of which there are more than 110 copies in E. ortleppi. For E. granulosus, we have cloned and characterized 10 distinct upstream promoter regions of AgB3 from a single metacestode. Our sequences suggest that AgB1 and AgB3 are involved in gene conversion. These results are discussed in light of the role of gene redundancy and recombination in parasite evasion mechanisms of host immunity, which at present are known for protozoan organisms, but virtually unknown for multicellular parasites.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno and Müller, Norbert

ISSN:

0031-1820

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/S0031182006000564

PubMed ID:

16817991

Web of Science ID:

000240923700003

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18670 (FactScience: 877)

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