14-3-3- and II/3-10-gene expression as molecular markers to address viability and growth activity of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes

Matsumoto, J; Müller, N; Hemphill, A; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M; Gottstein, B (2006). 14-3-3- and II/3-10-gene expression as molecular markers to address viability and growth activity of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes. Parasitology, 132(Pt 1), pp. 83-94. London: Cambridge University Press 10.1017/S0031182005008632

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The present study aimed to search for and characterize parasite molecules, whose expression levels correlate with the viability and growth activity of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes. We focused on the expression profiles of 2 parasite-derived genes, 14-3-3 and II/3-10, as putative molecular markers for viability and growth activity of the larval parasite. In experiments in vivo, gene expression levels of 14-3-3 and II/3-10 were relatively quantified by real-time reverse transcription-PCR using a housekeeping gene, beta-actin, as a reference reaction. All three reactions were compared with growth activity of the parasite developing in permissive nu/nu and in non-permissive wild type BALB/c mice. At 2 months p.i., the transcription level of 14-3-3 was significantly higher in parasites actively proliferating in nu/nu mice compared to parasites moderately growing in wild type mice. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed at the protein level that 14-3-3 was over-expressed in parasites derived from nu/nu mice at 2 months p.i. In vitro treatment of E. multilocularis with an anti-echinococcal drug nitazoxanide resulted in a significant decrease of both 14-3-3 and II/3-10 transcription levels found after 8 days of treatment, which correlated with the kinetics of a housekeeping gene, beta-actin. The conclusion is that 14-3-3, combined with II/3-10, exhibits good potential as a molecular marker to assess viability and growth activity of the parasite.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Matsumoto, Jun; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew and Gottstein, Bruno

ISSN:

0031-1820

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:06

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/S0031182005008632

PubMed ID:

16393357

Web of Science ID:

000235113000010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18678 (FactScience: 885)

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