Creatine promotes the GABAergic phenotype in human fetal spinal cord cultures

Ducray, Angélique; Qualls, Rachel; Schlattner, Uwe; Andres, Robert H; Dreher, Ekkehard; Seiler, Rolf W; Wallimann, Theo; Widmer, Hans Rudolf (2007). Creatine promotes the GABAergic phenotype in human fetal spinal cord cultures. Brain research, 1137(1), pp. 50-7. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.brainres.2006.12.038

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In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of cytosolic brain specific-BB-CK and ubiquitous mitochondrial-creatine kinases (uMt-CK) in developing human spinal cord. Consequently, we studied the effects of creatine treatment on cultured fetal human spinal cord tissue. We found that both CK isoforms were expressed in fetal spinal cord at all time points investigated (5 to 11.5 weeks post conception) and correspondingly specific CK activity was detected. Chronic creatine exposure resulted in significantly higher densities of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the cultures, while total neuronal cell density was not altered, suggesting a differentiation inducing mechanism of creatine supplementation. Taken together, our observations favour the view that the creatine phosphocreatine system plays an important role in the developing CNS.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurosurgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology

UniBE Contributor:

Ducray, Angélique; Andres, Robert; Dreher, Ekkehard; Seiler, Rolf and Widmer, Hans Rudolf

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0006-8993

ISBN:

17223088

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

04 May 2018 13:19

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.brainres.2006.12.038

PubMed ID:

17223088

Web of Science ID:

000244849300006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18821 (FactScience: 1059)

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