Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) in the treatment of neovascular glaucoma

Iliev, Milko E; Domig, Diego; Wolf-Schnurrbursch, Ute; Wolf, Sebastian; Sarra, Gian-Marco (2006). Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) in the treatment of neovascular glaucoma. American journal of ophthalmology, 142(6), pp. 1054-6. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier Science 10.1016/j.ajo.2006.06.066

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

PURPOSE: To describe a case series of neovascular glaucoma (NVG) caused by central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) that was treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB; Avastin). DESIGN: Retrospective interventional case series. METHODS: Six consecutive patients with NVG and a refractory, symptomatic elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) and pronounced anterior segment congestion received IVB (1.25 mg/0.05 ml). Diode laser cyclophotocoagulation was carried out only if pressure was controlled insufficiently by topical medication. Follow-up examinations occurred at four to 16 weeks. RESULTS: IVB resulted in a marked regression of anterior segment neovascularization and relief of symptoms within 48 hours. IOP decreased substantially in three eyes; in the other three eyes, adjuvant cyclophotocoagulation was necessary. No side effects were observed. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was performed as soon as feasible, five to 12 weeks after IVB treatment. CONCLUSION: IVB leads to a rapid regression of iris and angle neovascularization and should be investigated more thoroughly as an adjunct in the management of NVG.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ophthalmology

UniBE Contributor:

Iliev, Milko Emilov; Domig, Diego; Wolf, Sebastian and Sarra, Gian-Marco

ISSN:

0002-9394

ISBN:

17157590

Publisher:

Elsevier Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:45

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ajo.2006.06.066

PubMed ID:

17157590

Web of Science ID:

000242671100022

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18846 (FactScience: 1099)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback