Effect of acute hypoxia on maximal oxygen uptake and maximal performance during leg and upper-body exercise in Nordic combined skiers

Angermann, M; Hoppeler, H; Wittwer, M; Däpp, C; Howald, H; Vogt, M (2006). Effect of acute hypoxia on maximal oxygen uptake and maximal performance during leg and upper-body exercise in Nordic combined skiers. International journal of sports medicine, 27(4), pp. 301-6. Stuttgart: Thieme 10.1055/s-2005-865652

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We examined the effect of normobaric hypoxia (3200 m) on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximal power output (Pmax) during leg and upper-body exercise to identify functional and structural correlates of the variability in the decrement of VO2max (DeltaVO2max) and of maximal power output (DeltaPmax). Seven well trained male Nordic combined skiers performed incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer (leg exercise) and on a custom built doublepoling ergometer for cross-country skiing (upper-body exercise). Tests were carried out in normoxia (560 m) and normobaric hypoxia (3200 m); biopsies were taken from m. deltoideus. DeltaVO2max was not significantly different between leg (-9.1+/-4.9%) and upper-body exercise (-7.9+/-5.8%). By contrast, Pmax was significantly more reduced during leg exercise (-17.3+/-3.3%) than during upper-body exercise (-9.6+/-6.4%, p<0.05). Correlation analysis did not reveal any significant relationship between leg and upper-body exercise neither for DeltaVO2max nor for DeltaPmax. Furthermore, no relationship was observed between individual DeltaVO2max and DeltaPmax. Analysis of structural data of m. deltoideus revealed a significant correlation between capillary density and DeltaPmax (R=-0.80, p=0.03), as well as between volume density of mitochondria and DeltaPmax (R=-0.75, p=0.05). In conclusion, it seems that VO2max and Pmax are differently affected by hypoxia. The ability to tolerate hypoxia is a characteristic of the individual depending in part on the exercise mode. We present evidence that athletes with a high capillarity and a high muscular oxidative capacity are more sensitive to hypoxia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Functional Anatomy

UniBE Contributor:

Hoppeler, Hans-Heinrich; Däpp, Christoph and Vogt, Michael

ISSN:

0172-4622

ISBN:

16572373

Publisher:

Thieme

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:13

Publisher DOI:

10.1055/s-2005-865652

PubMed ID:

16572373

Web of Science ID:

000236628200008

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/18932 (FactScience: 1203)

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