[Antirheumatic therapy and reproduction. The influence on fertility, pregnancy and breast feeding]

Ostensen, M (2006). [Antirheumatic therapy and reproduction. The influence on fertility, pregnancy and breast feeding]. Zeitschrift für Rheumatologie, 65(3), 217-20, 222-4. Heidelberg: Steinkopff-Verlag 10.1007/s00393-006-0052-5

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Antirheumatic drugs can have a negative effect on reproduction in both men and women. Possible negative effects are impairment of fertility, harmful effects on the fetus and adverse effects on the breastfed child. In women non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) and cyclophosphamide can impair fertility. In men infertility can result from the use of salazopyrine and cyclophosphamide. A desire for children should be taken into account before the start of disease modifying drugs (DMARD). Treatment with NSAID is possible at some stages of pregnancy as well as during lactation. A limited number of DMARD is compatible with pregnancy and is presented. Cytostatic drugs and leflunomide must be prophylactically withdrawn before a planned pregnancy. TNF alpha antagonists should be discontinued at the start of pregnancy. Safe birth control must be practised during therapy with drugs that are gonadotoxic or teratogenic. Treatment with immunosuppressive drugs during lactation is limited because of insufficient documentation of safety for the breastfed child.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergology

UniBE Contributor:

Oestensen, Monika Elisabeth

ISSN:

0340-1855

ISBN:

16670813

Publisher:

Steinkopff-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 06:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00393-006-0052-5

PubMed ID:

16670813

Web of Science ID:

000238089500006

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.19120

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19120 (FactScience: 1498)

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