Decreasing gut wall glucose as an early marker of impaired intestinal perfusion

Krejci, Vladimir; Hiltebrand, Luzius; Büchi, Conradin; Ali, Syed Z; Contaldo, Claudio; Takala, Jukka; Sigurdsson, Gisli H; Jakob, Stephan M (2006). Decreasing gut wall glucose as an early marker of impaired intestinal perfusion. Critical care medicine, 34(9), pp. 2406-14. Baltimore, Md.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/01.CCM.0000233855.34344.29

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OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the microcirculatory and metabolic consequences of reduced mesenteric blood flow. DESIGN: Prospective, controlled animal study. SETTING: The surgical research unit of a university hospital. SUBJECTS: A total of 13 anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were subjected to stepwise mesenteric blood flow reduction (15% in each step, n = 8) or served as controls (n = 5). Superior mesenteric arterial blood flow was measured with ultrasonic transit time flowmetry, and mucosal and muscularis microcirculatory perfusion in the small bowel were each measured with three laser Doppler flow probes. Small-bowel intramucosal Pco2 was measured by tonometry, and glucose, lactate (L), and pyruvate (P) were measured by microdialysis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: In control animals, superior mesenteric arterial blood flow, mucosal microcirculatory blood flow, intramucosal Pco2, and the lactate/pyruvate ratio remained unchanged. In both groups, mucosal blood flow was better preserved than muscularis blood flow. During stepwise mesenteric blood flow reduction, heterogeneous microcirculatory blood flow remained a prominent feature (coefficient of variation, approximately 45%). A 30% flow reduction from baseline was associated with a decrease in microdialysis glucose concentration from 2.37 (2.10-2.70) mmol/L to 0.57 (0.22-1.60) mmol/L (p < .05). After 75% flow reduction, the microdialysis lactate/pyruvate ratio increased from 8.6 (8.0-14.1) to 27.6 (15.5-37.4, p < .05), and arterial-intramucosal Pco2 gradients increased from 1.3 (0.4-3.5) kPa to 10.8 (8.0-16.0) kPa (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Blood flow redistribution and heterogeneous microcirculatory perfusion can explain apparently maintained regional oxidative metabolism during mesenteric hypoperfusion, despite local signs of anaerobic metabolism. Early decreasing glucose concentrations suggest that substrate supply may become crucial before oxygen consumption decreases.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Krejci, Vladimir; Hiltebrand, Luzius; Ali, Syed Z.; Takala, Jukka and Jakob, Stephan

ISSN:

0090-3493

ISBN:

16878039

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

23 Jan 2018 12:18

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/01.CCM.0000233855.34344.29

PubMed ID:

16878039

Web of Science ID:

000240010400019

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19140 (FactScience: 1529)

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