Characteristics of the gut microbiome of Swiss elite athletes with a spinal cord injury: An exploratory study.

Valido, Ezra; Bertolo, Alessandro; Hertig-Godeschalk, Anneke; Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Ruettimann, Belinda; Glisic, Marija; Stoyanov, Jivko (2024). Characteristics of the gut microbiome of Swiss elite athletes with a spinal cord injury: An exploratory study. (In Press). The journal of spinal cord medicine, pp. 1-9. Taylor & Francis 10.1080/10790268.2023.2265610

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OBJECTIVES

To illustrate and explore associations between the gut microbiome and spinal cord injury (SCI) characteristics, physical training, dietary intake, body composition, and blood biomarkers of elite Swiss athletes.

DESIGN AND SETTING

Baseline data analysis of athletes with SCI who participated in a pilot trial (NCT04659408) in the Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland.

PARTICIPANTS

Elite athletes, five males, and six females, with SCI who competed internationally.

OUTCOME MEASURES

We conducted a differential abundance analysis and measured the alpha and beta diversity of the gut microbiome.

RESULTS

The athletes' median age was 34.5 years. Six had traumatic SCI and five had a spina bifida. The athletes competed in para-cycling (5), wheelchair athletics (3), and wheelchair tennis (3). A higher duration of training per week was positively associated with Akkermansia and Akkermansiaceae but negatively associated with Prevotellaceae. Muribaculaceae was negatively associated with the average number of trainings per week. Waist circumference is negatively associated with Butyricimonas. Significant differences in the alpha diversity were found with sex, gastrointestinal quality of life index (GIQLI) scores, total caloric intake, total fat intake, total carbohydrate intake, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Beta diversity differences were found with impairment of the sympathetic nervous system of the gut at the genus level and HbA1c at the family level.

CONCLUSIONS

This study provides insight into the gut microbiome of athletes with SCI. Our results were similar to those found in athletes without SCI. Further replication is needed to confirm the relationships of organisms observed in the gut of athletes with SCI.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Orthopaedic Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Bertolo, Alessandro, Glisic, Marija, Stoyanov, Jivko

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2045-7723

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Funders:

[223] Swiss Paraplegic Foundation = Schweizer Paraplegiker-Stiftung ; [134] Swiss Olympic ; [222] Horizon 2020 ; [226] Swiss School of Public Health Global P3HS

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pubmed Import

Date Deposited:

15 Jan 2024 12:33

Last Modified:

17 Jan 2024 12:59

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/10790268.2023.2265610

PubMed ID:

38207282

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Gut microbiome Spinal cord injury Wheelchair athletes Word

BORIS DOI:

10.48350/191549

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/191549

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