Induction of haem oxygenase-1 causes cortical non-haem iron increase in experimental pneumococcal meningitis: evidence that concomitant ferritin up-regulation prevents iron-induced oxidative damage

Ren, Hao; Leib, Stephen L.; Ferriero, Donna M; Täuber, Martin G.; Christen, Stephan (2007). Induction of haem oxygenase-1 causes cortical non-haem iron increase in experimental pneumococcal meningitis: evidence that concomitant ferritin up-regulation prevents iron-induced oxidative damage. Journal of neurochemistry, 100(2), pp. 532-544. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.04230.x

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Desferrioxamine inhibits cortical necrosis in neonatal rats with experimental pneumococcal meningitis, suggesting that iron-induced oxidative damage might be responsible for neuronal damage. We therefore examined the spatial and temporal profile of changes in cortical iron and iron homeostatic proteins during pneumococcal meningitis. Infection was associated with a steady and global increase of non-haem iron in the cortex, particularly in neuronal cell bodies of layer II and V, and in capillary endothelial cells. The non-haem iron increase was associated with induction of haem oxygenase (HO)-1 in neurones, microglia and capillary endothelial cells, whereas HO-2 levels remained unchanged, suggesting that the non-haem iron increase might be the result of HO-1-mediated haem degradation. Indeed, treatment with the haem oxygenase inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (which completely blocked the accumulation of bilirubin detected in HO-1-positive cells) completely prevented the infection-associated non-haem iron increase. The same cells also displayed markedly increased ferritin staining, the increase of which occurred independently of HO activity. At the same time, no increase in DNA/RNA oxidation was observed in infected animals (as assessed by in situ detection of 8-hydroxy[deoxy]guanosine), strongly suggesting that ferritin up-regulation protected the brain from iron-induced oxidative damage. Thus, although pneumococcal meningitis leads to an increase of cortical non-haem iron, protective mechanisms up-regulated in parallel prevent iron-induced oxidative damage. Cortical damage does not appear to be a direct consequence of increased iron, therefore.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Leib, Stephen; Täuber, Martin G. and Christen, Stephan

ISSN:

0022-3042

ISBN:

17116231

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

05 Aug 2014 16:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.04230.x

PubMed ID:

17116231

Web of Science ID:

000242993300023

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19168 (FactScience: 1584)

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