Continent urinary diversion

Burkhard, Fiona C; Kessler, Thomas M; Mills, Rob; Studer, Urs E (2006). Continent urinary diversion. Critical reviews in oncology, hematology, 57(3), pp. 255-64. Boca Raton, Fla.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2005.06.008

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During the last decade continent urinary diversion, especially orthotopic bladder substitution has become increasingly popular following radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. In general, if sphincter sparing surgery is possible, orthotopic bladder substitution is performed, if not then continent catheterisable reservoirs are a viable option. Strict patient selection criteria and improved surgical technique have had a positive influence on outcome, not only on survival but also on quality of life issues. It is becoming increasingly obvious, that a nerve sparing surgical technique not only improves sexual function but also continence. In addition, the length of the intestinal segment has an influence on continence and the degree of metabolic consequences, which are discussed in detail. Postoperative surveillance and instruction of patients is of utmost value for good functional results. Overall patient satisfaction and quality of life seem comparable in the various types of continent urinary diversions, and improved when compared to a urinary stoma. Continent urinary diversion offers a good quality of life with few long-term complications and should be considered the treatment of choice in the majority of patients, independent of sex.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Urology

UniBE Contributor:

Burkhard, Fiona C.; Kessler, Thomas M. and Studer, Urs

ISSN:

1040-8428

ISBN:

16325414

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:46

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:42

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.critrevonc.2005.06.008

PubMed ID:

16325414

Web of Science ID:

000235858500005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19260 (FactScience: 1755)

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