Gas embolism following intraosseous medication application proven by post-mortem multislice computed tomography and autopsy

Hillewig, Elke; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Christe, Andreas; Plattner, Thomas; Thali, Michael J (2007). Gas embolism following intraosseous medication application proven by post-mortem multislice computed tomography and autopsy. Resuscitation, 72(1), pp. 149-53. Shannon: Elsevier Science Ireland 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.06.023

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The post-mortem use of modern imaging techniques such as multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is becoming increasingly important as an aid for conventional autopsy. This article presents a case of a 4-month-old boy who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) with intravascular gas after an intraosseus medication application documented by post-mortem MSCT. It is most likely that the gas entered the body during resuscitation. This case emphasises the advantage of post-mortem imaging as a complementary aid for the autopsy. We conclude that during emergency treatment, the medical staff should be aware of the possibility of causing a gas embolism following intraosseus medication. Resuscitation with an inserted, disconnected intraosseous needle should be avoided.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Management
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine (DRNN) > Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology

UniBE Contributor:

Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Christe, Andreas; Plattner, Thomas and Thali, Michael

ISSN:

0300-9572

ISBN:

17123688

Publisher:

Elsevier Science Ireland

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:47

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:42

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.06.023

PubMed ID:

17123688

Web of Science ID:

000243663600021

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19321 (FactScience: 1853)

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