The use of light- and electron microscopy for studies on the cell- and molecular biology of parasites and parasitic diseases

Hehl, A B; Hemphill, A (2006). The use of light- and electron microscopy for studies on the cell- and molecular biology of parasites and parasitic diseases. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 148(9), pp. 473-81. Bern: Huber 10.1024/0036-7281.148.9.473

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Lightmicroscopical (LM) and electron microscopi cal (EM) techniques, have had a major influence on the development and direction of cell biology, and particularly also on the investigation of complex host-parasite relationships. Earlier, microscopy has been rather descriptive, but new technical and scientific advances have changed the situation. Microscopy has now become analytical, quantitative and three-dimensional, with greater emphasis on analysis of live cells with fluorescent markers. The new or improved techniques that have become available include immunocytochemistry using immunogold labeling techniques or fluorescent probes, cryopreservation and cryosectioning, in situ hybridization, fluorescent reporters for subcellular localization, micro-analytical methods for elemental distribution, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and live-imaging. Taken together, these tools are providing both researchers and students with a novel and multidimensional view of the intricate biological processes during parasite development in the host.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Hemphill, Andrew

ISSN:

0036-7281

Publisher:

Huber

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:47

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1024/0036-7281.148.9.473

PubMed ID:

17024976

Web of Science ID:

000241096500005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19725 (FactScience: 2652)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback