Responsiveness and habituation of soluble icam-1 to acute psychosocial stress in men: determinants and efect of stress-hemoconcentration

von Känel, R; Preckel, D; Kudielka, B M; Fischer, J E (2006). Responsiveness and habituation of soluble icam-1 to acute psychosocial stress in men: determinants and efect of stress-hemoconcentration. Physiological research, 56(5), pp. 627-639. Praha: Academia Scientiarum Bohemoslovaca

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We studied the psychophysiology of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in 25 apparently healthy middle-aged men who underwent an acute psychosocial stressor three times with one week apart. Measures of the biological stress response were obtained at week one and three. The magnitude of the sICAM-1 stress response showed no habituation between visits. At week one, cognitive stress appraisal independently predicted integrated sICAM-1 area under the curve (AUC) between rest, immediately post-stress, and 45 min and 105 min post-stress (beta=.67, p=.012, deltaR(2)=.41). Diastolic blood pressure AUC (beta=-.45, p=.048, deltaR(2)=.21) and heart rate (AUC) (beta=.44, p=.055, deltaR(2)=.21) were independent predictors of sICAM-1 (AUC) at week three. Adjustment for hemoconcentration yielded a decrease in sICAM-1 levels from rest to post-stress (p<.001). Stress responsiveness of plasma sICAM-1 was predicted by stress perception and hemodynamic reactivity and affected by stress-hemoconcentration but unrelated to cortisol reactivity and not readily adapting to stress repeats.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology > Centre of Competence for Psychosomatic Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

von Känel, Roland

ISSN:

0862-8408

ISBN:

17184150

Publisher:

Academia Scientiarum Bohemoslovaca

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:47

Last Modified:

08 Jun 2016 10:39

PubMed ID:

17184150

Web of Science ID:

000251086200014

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/19757 (FactScience: 2693)

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