Attacks on German public figures, 1968-2004: warning behaviors, potentially lethal and non-lethal acts, psychiatric status, and motivations

Hoffmann, Jens; Meloy, J Reid; Guldimann, Angela; Ermer, Anneliese (2011). Attacks on German public figures, 1968-2004: warning behaviors, potentially lethal and non-lethal acts, psychiatric status, and motivations. Behavioral sciences & the law, 29(2), pp. 155-79. New York, N.Y.: Wiley 10.1002/bsl.979

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Fourteen non-terrorist attackers of public figures in Germany between 1968 and 2004 were intensively studied, with a particular focus on warning behaviors, attack behaviors, and the relationship between psychiatric diagnosis, symptoms, and motivations for the assault. A large proportion of the attackers were severely mentally ill, and most likely to be in the potentially lethal rather than the non-lethal group. A new typology of seven warning behaviors was applied to the data, and all were present, most frequently fixation and pathway warning behavior, and least frequently a direct threat. Psychiatric diagnosis could be closely linked to motivation when analyzed at the level of symptom and content of thought, often delusional. Most of the attacks were directed at political figures, and the majority occurred after 1995.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Forensic Psychiatric Services
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Legal Medicine > Forensic Psychiatric Services

UniBE Contributor:

Guldimann, Angela and Ermer, Anneliese

ISSN:

0735-3936

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:11

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/bsl.979

PubMed ID:

21381093

Web of Science ID:

000288791000003

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1979 (FactScience: 204087)

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