Quantifying leukocytes in first catch urine provides new insights into our understanding of symptomatic and asymptomatic urethritis

Wiggins, Rebecca C; Holmes, Christopher H; Andersson, Monique; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Low, Nicola; Horner, Patrick J (2006). Quantifying leukocytes in first catch urine provides new insights into our understanding of symptomatic and asymptomatic urethritis. International journal of STD & AIDS, 17(5), 289-95.. London: Sage 10.1258/095646206776790268

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We quantitatively investigated inflammatory cells in the male urethra. Leukocytes in the first catch urine (FCU) from 87 men with and without urethritis were quantitated using haemocytometer counts and stained with an anti-CD45 pan-leukocyte antibody. An increased number of leukocytes in FCU specimens was associated with urethritis (P > 0.002), the presence of discharge and/or dysuria (P < 0.001), and detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (P < 0.001) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (P < 0.001). In men with urethritis, higher leukocyte counts were also observed in the above groups (P = 0.07, 0.03 and P < 0.0001, respectively). As leukocyte number increased, the likelihood of detecting either pathogen increased. This study suggests that symptoms and signs are a surrogate marker for the degree of inflammation present, and that as urethral inflammation increases, the likelihood of detecting a sexually transmitted pathogen also increases. This would explain why men with asymptomatic urethritis are less likely to have a sexually transmitted infection detected than those with discharge and/or dysuria.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Low, Nicola

ISSN:

0956-4624

ISBN:

16643676

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:48

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1258/095646206776790268

PubMed ID:

16643676

Web of Science ID:

000237509400002

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/20090 (FactScience: 3208)

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