The common G-allele of interleukin-18 single-nucleotide polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for atopic asthma. The SAPALDIA Cohort Study

Imboden, M; Nicod, L; Nieters, A; Glaus, E; Matyas, G; Bircher, AJ; Ackermann-Liebrich, U; Berger, W; Probst-Hensch, NM; SAPALDIA, Team (2006). The common G-allele of interleukin-18 single-nucleotide polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for atopic asthma. The SAPALDIA Cohort Study. Clinical and experimental allergy, 36(2), pp. 211-8. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications 10.1111/j.1365-2222.2006.02424.x

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BACKGROUND: IL-18 is a pleiotrophic cytokine involved in both, T-helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 differentiation. Recently genetic variants in the IL-18 gene have been associated with increased risk of atopy and asthma. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of a genetic, haplotype-tagging promotor variant -137G/C in the IL-18 gene with atopic asthma in a large, well-characterized and population-based study of adults. METHODS: Prospective cohort study design was used to collect interview and biological measurement data at two examination time-points 11 years apart. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association of genotype with asthma and atopy. RESULTS: The G-allele of the IL-18 promotor variant (-137G/C) was associated with a markedly increased risk for the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma with concomitant skin reactivity to common allergens. Stratification of the asthma cases by skin reactivity to common allergens revealed an exclusive association of IL-18 -137 G-allele with an increased prevalence of atopic asthma (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 3.63; 95% confidence interval: (1.64-8.02) for GC or GG carriers vs. CC carriers), and no according association with asthma and concomitant negative skin reactivity (adjusted OR: 1.13; 0.66-1.94). The interaction between IL-18 -137G/C genotype and positive skin prick test was statistically significant (P=0.029). None of 74 incident asthma cases with atopy at baseline exhibited the CC genotype. CONCLUSION: Our results strongly suggest that this variant of the IL-18 gene is an important genetic determinant involved in the development of atopic asthma.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Nicod, Laurent

ISSN:

0954-7894

ISBN:

16433859

Publisher:

Blackwell Scientific Publications

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:48

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:49

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1365-2222.2006.02424.x

PubMed ID:

16433859

Web of Science ID:

000234796100011

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/20228 (FactScience: 3407)

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