Facial affect recognition training in autism: can we animate the fusiform gyrus?

Bölte, Sven; Hubl, Daniela; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Prvulovic, David; Dierks, Thomas; Poustka, Fritz (2006). Facial affect recognition training in autism: can we animate the fusiform gyrus? Behavioral neuroscience, 120(1), pp. 211-6. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association 10.1037/0735-7044.120.1.211

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One of the most consistent findings in the neuroscience of autism is hypoactivation of the fusiform gyrus (FG) during face processing. In this study the authors examined whether successful facial affect recognition training is associated with an increased activation of the FG in autism. The effect of a computer-based program to teach facial affect identification was examined in 10 individuals with high-functioning autism. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) changes in the FG and other regions of interest, as well as behavioral facial affect recognition measures, were assessed pre- and posttraining. No significant activation changes in the FG were observed. Trained participants showed behavioral improvements, which were accompanied by higher BOLD fMRI signals in the superior parietal lobule and maintained activation in the right medial occipital gyrus.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > UPD Murtenstrasse
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Hubl, Daniela and Dierks, Thomas

ISSN:

0735-7044

ISBN:

16492133

Publisher:

American Psychological Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:51

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2015 21:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1037/0735-7044.120.1.211

PubMed ID:

16492133

Web of Science ID:

000235794700023

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/21750 (FactScience: 13547)

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