In utero transplantation of autologous and allogeneic fetal liver stem cells in ovine fetuses

Schoeberlein, A; Holzgreve, W; Dudler, L; Hahn, S; Surbek, DV (2004). In utero transplantation of autologous and allogeneic fetal liver stem cells in ovine fetuses. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 3(191), pp. 1030-6. Orlando, Fla.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.ajog.2004.06.042

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OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of autologous stem cell transplantation in fetal sheep and to compare short-term engraftment of allogeneic and autologous fetal liver stem cells in an immunocompetent large animal model. STUDY DESIGN: Fetal liver stem cells were collected from preimmune sheep fetuses with an open or ultrasound-guided technique. After being labeled with PKH26, the cells were transplanted intraperitoneally into allogeneic and autologous fetal recipients at 48 to 64 days of gestation. Engraftment was determined by flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction 1 to 2 weeks after transplantation. RESULTS: Fetal loss rate was 29% (allogeneic transplantation) and 73% (autologous transplantation). Engraftment of donor cells was found in all fetuses, with a level of < or =4.7% in fetal liver, spleen, bone marrow, blood and thymus. Overall, there was no difference between allogeneic and autologous grafts. CONCLUSION: Autologous in utero transplantation of fetal liver stem cells in fetal sheep is feasible, but yields a high loss rate. Differences in the major histocompatibility complex between donor and recipient seems not to have a major impact on stem cell engraftment early in gestation; major histocompatibility complex-independent donor/host competition might be responsible for low engraftment in immunocompetent recipients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology

UniBE Contributor:

Surbek, Daniel

ISSN:

0002-9378

ISBN:

15467585

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:52

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ajog.2004.06.042

PubMed ID:

15467585

Web of Science ID:

000224326600061

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/21857 (FactScience: 16294)

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