Uptake of bone-related matrix proteins into implanted deproteinized bovine bone mineral

Bosshardt, Dieter; Wallkamm, Beat; Schenk, Robert Konrad; Buser, Daniel; Lang, Niklaus Peter (2006). Uptake of bone-related matrix proteins into implanted deproteinized bovine bone mineral. Bone, 38(3)(Suppl. 1), pp. 8-9. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.bone.2006.01.069

Deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) (Bio-Oss®, Geistlich-Pharma, Wohlhusen, Switzerland) is widely used as a bone substitute for the preservation or augmentation of bone volume. After implantation near native bone, new bone may form around the DBBM particles. Since DBBM is very resistant to resorption, it will hardly ever be replaced by bone and, therefore, the mechanical stability largely depends on the extent of bridging between the newly formed bone and the DBBM particles. The molecular factors responsible for the deposition of new bone to the DBBM particles have not been determined. The aim of this study was, therefore, to test the hypothesis that DBBM implanted near bone take up bone-related matrix proteins that are involved in cell-matrix interactions. Cylindrical biopsies harvested from tooth extraction sites filled with DBBM particles were fixed in aldehydes, decalcified, and embedded in LR White resin. Thin sections were incubated with antibodies against bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN), two bone proteins involved in cell attachment, signaling, and mineralization. High-resolution immunogold labeling was used to examine protein distribution. BSP and OPN were immunodetected in all DBBM particles and yielded an identical distribution pattern. Most gold particles were found over the peripheral DBBM matrix, although some peripheral regions lacked immunolabeling. The bulk of the interior DBBM portion was mainly free of labeling with the exception of the peripheral matrix of some osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi. It is concluded that DBBM selectively takes up at least BSP and OPN after its implantation at a bone site. BSP and OPN or other molecules accommodating in DBBM may modulate events associated with cell attachment and differentiation.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Abstract)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology

UniBE Contributor:

Bosshardt, Dieter; Wallkamm, Beat; Schenk, Robert Konrad; Buser, Daniel and Lang, Niklaus Peter

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

8756-3282

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:52

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.bone.2006.01.069

Web of Science ID:

000236051300011

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/21894 (FactScience: 19566)

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