Snake venoms and hemostasis

Lu, Q; Clemetson, JM; Clemetson, KJ (2005). Snake venoms and hemostasis. Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis, 3(8), pp. 1791-9. Oxford: Blackwell 10.1111/j.1538-7836.2005.01358.x

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Snake venoms are complex mixtures of biologically active proteins and peptides. Many of them affect hemostasis by activating or inhibiting coagulant factors or platelets, or by disrupting endothelium. Based on sequence, these snake venom components have been classified into various families, such as serine proteases, metalloproteinases, C-type lectins, disintegrins and phospholipases. The various members of a particular family act selectively on different blood coagulation factors, blood cells or tissues. For almost every factor involved in coagulation or fibrinolysis there is a venom protein that can activate or inactivate it. Venom proteins affect platelet function by binding or degrading vWF or platelet receptors, activating protease-activated receptors or modulating ADP release and thromboxane A2 formation. Some venom enzymes cleave key basement membrane components and directly affect capillary blood vessels to cause hemorrhaging. L-Amino acid oxidases activate platelets via H2O2 production.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Theodor Kocher Institute

UniBE Contributor:

Clemetson, Kenneth John

ISSN:

1538-7933

ISBN:

16102046

Publisher:

Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:52

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1538-7836.2005.01358.x

PubMed ID:

16102046

Web of Science ID:

000230776000029

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22189 (FactScience: 32232)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback