Reduced incidence of insect-bite hypersensitivity in Icelandic horses is associated with a down-regulation of interleukin-4 by interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta1

Hamza, Eman; Wagner, Bettina; Jungi, Thomas W; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Marti, Eliane (2008). Reduced incidence of insect-bite hypersensitivity in Icelandic horses is associated with a down-regulation of interleukin-4 by interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta1. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology, 122(1-2), p. 65. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.vetimm.2007.10.018

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Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of horses caused by IgE-mediated reactions to bites of insects of the genus Culicoides. IBH does not occur in Iceland due to the absence of Culicoides. However, Icelandic horses exported to mainland Europe as adults (1st generation) have a >/=50% incidence of developing IBH. In contrast, their progeny (2nd generation) has a <10% incidence of IBH. Here we show that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Icelandic horses born in mainland Europe and belonging either to the IBH or healthy subgroup produce less interleukin (IL)-4 after polyclonal or allergen-specific stimulation when compared with counterparts from horses born in Iceland. We examined a role of IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in down-regulation of IL-4 in healthy 2nd generation Icelandic horses. Supernatants of PBMC from 2nd generation healthy horses down-regulated the proportion of IL-4-producing cells and IL-4 production in stimulated cultures of PBMC from 1st generation IBH. This inhibition was mimicked by a combination of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 but not by the single cytokines. Cultures of stimulated PBMC of healthy 2nd generation horses produced a low level of IL-4, but IL-4 production was increased by anti-equine IL-10 and anti-human TGF-beta1. This shows for the first time that in horses, IL-10 and TGF-beta1 combined regulate IL-4 production in vitro. It is suggested that in this naturally occurring IgE-mediated allergy, IL-10 and TGF-beta1 have a role in the down-regulation of IL-4-induced allergen-specific Th2 cells, thereby reducing the incidence of IBH.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DVK - Clinical Research (discontinued)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Virology and Immunology

UniBE Contributor:

Hamza, Eman; Jungi, Thomas; Mirkovitch, Jelena and Marti, Eliane Isabelle

ISSN:

0165-2427

Publisher:

Elsevier

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:52

Last Modified:

03 Feb 2015 10:06

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.vetimm.2007.10.018

PubMed ID:

18082270

Web of Science ID:

000254766000008

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22264 (FactScience: 33685)

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