Distribution and genetic variability among Campylobacter spp. isolates from different animal species and humans in Switzerland

Keller, J; Wieland, B; Wittwer, M; Stephan, R; Perreten, V (2007). Distribution and genetic variability among Campylobacter spp. isolates from different animal species and humans in Switzerland. Zoonoses and public health, 54(1), pp. 2-7. Berlin: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/j.1863-2378.2007.00981.x

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

In Switzerland, a national database with 1028 Campylobacter isolates from poultry, pigs, cats, dogs, cattle, humans, zoo animals and water has been created. The database contains the genetic fingerprint and background information of each Campylobacter isolate. Dominant species could be identified in the different sources with a majority of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry (73%), humans (79%), cattle (95%), zoo animals (40%) and water (100%), of Campylobacter coli in pigs (72%), and of Campylobacter upsaliensis/helveticus in cats and dogs (55%). The comparison of three genotyping methods, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), pulsed field gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism, revealed that AFLP allows discrimination between the different Campylobacter species and is the most appropriate method to distinguish specific strains within the same species. Genotyping analysis demonstrated that the Campylobacter population is heterogeneous among the different sources and that no dominant clone is spread in the country. Genotyping and the resulting database are useful tools to trace back future Campylobacter infections.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology

UniBE Contributor:

Perreten, Vincent

ISSN:

1863-1959

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:53

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1863-2378.2007.00981.x

PubMed ID:

17359440

Web of Science ID:

000245472400002

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22481 (FactScience: 34912)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback