Treatment of tibial fractures with plates using minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis in dogs and cats

Schmökel, H G; Stein, S; Radke, H; Hurter, K; Schawalder, P (2007). Treatment of tibial fractures with plates using minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis in dogs and cats. Journal of small animal practice, 48(3), pp. 157-60. Oxford: Pergamon Press 10.1111/j.1748-5827.2006.00260.x

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OBJECTIVES: The aim of the here described case series was to develop and evaluate the minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis for the plate fixation of tibial fractures in dogs and cats. METHODS: Six dogs and four cats with shaft fractures of the tibia were treated using minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis. Follow-up radiographs four to six weeks after fracture fixation were evaluated for fracture healing. For the long-term follow-up (minimum 2.4 years), owners were contacted by phone to complete a questionnaire. RESULTS: All fractures healed without the need for a second procedure. Follow-up radiographs obtained after four to six weeks in seven cases showed advanced bony healing with callus formation and filling of the fracture gaps with calcified tissue in all seven. All the patients had a good to excellent long-term result with full limb function. The time needed for regaining full limb use was two to three months. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Minimally invasive percutaneous osteosynthesis seems to be a useful technique for the treatment of tibial shaft fractures in dogs and cats.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Schawalder, Peter

ISSN:

0022-4510

Publisher:

Pergamon Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:53

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/j.1748-5827.2006.00260.x

PubMed ID:

17355607

Web of Science ID:

000245314700019

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22671 (FactScience: 35830)

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