Surveillance systems for sexually transmitted diseases in Switzerland

Zwahlen, Marcel; Spoerri, Adrian; Gebhardt, Martin; Mäusezahl, Mirjam; Boubaker, Karim; Low, Nicola (2007). Surveillance systems for sexually transmitted diseases in Switzerland. Sexually transmitted diseases, 34(2), pp. 76-80. Philadelphia, Pa.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/01.olq.0000223248.96376.3b

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BACKGROUND: In Switzerland (population 7.4 million), 3 different systems contribute to surveillance for sexually transmitted infections. GOAL: The goal of this study was to compare time trends from surveillance systems for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. STUDY DESIGN: We studied surveillance data (1997-2003) from laboratory reports in women and men, men attending dermatology clinics, and women attending gynecologists. RESULTS: Laboratory reports of episodes of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae increased by 31% (from 2573 to 3449 cases) and 104% (from 259 to 528 cases), respectively. Over the same period, chlamydia reports from men attending dermatology clinics and women attending gynecologists did not change and dermatology clinic-based reports of gonorrhea in men increased only slightly. Syphilis reports from dermatology clinics increased by 127% (from 22 to 50 cases). CONCLUSIONS: Increases in laboratory reports of chlamydia and gonorrhea were not consistently detected in sentinel populations. Numbers of cases reported to all 3 systems were low. The performance of surveillance systems for sexually transmitted infections should be evaluated regularly.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Spörri, Adrian and Low, Nicola

ISSN:

0148-5717

ISBN:

16773035

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:54

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:46

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/01.olq.0000223248.96376.3b

PubMed ID:

16773035

Web of Science ID:

000243775600004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22766 (FactScience: 36528)

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