Effects of percutaneous coronary interventions in silent ischemia after myocardial infarction: the SWISSI II randomized controlled trial

Erne, Paul; Schoenenberger, Andreas W; Burckhardt, Dieter; Zuber, Michel; Kiowski, Wolfgang; Buser, Peter T; Dubach, Paul; Resink, Therese J; Pfisterer, Matthias (2007). Effects of percutaneous coronary interventions in silent ischemia after myocardial infarction: the SWISSI II randomized controlled trial. JAMA - the journal of the American Medical Association, 297(18), pp. 1985-91. Chicago, Ill.: American Medical Association 10.1001/jama.297.18.1985

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CONTEXT: The effect of a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the long-term prognosis of patients with silent ischemia after a myocardial infarction (MI) is not known. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether PCI compared with drug therapy improves long-term outcome of asymptomatic patients with silent ischemia after an MI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Randomized, unblinded, controlled trial (Swiss Interventional Study on Silent Ischemia Type II [SWISSI II]) conducted from May 2, 1991, to February 25, 1997, at 3 public hospitals in Switzerland of 201 patients with a recent MI, silent myocardial ischemia verified by stress imaging, and 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease. Follow-up ended on May 23, 2006. INTERVENTIONS: Percutaneous coronary intervention aimed at full revascularization (n = 96) or intensive anti-ischemic drug therapy (n = 105). All patients received 100 mg/d of aspirin and a statin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival free of major adverse cardiac events defined as cardiac death, nonfatal MI, and/or symptom-driven revascularization. Secondary measures included exercise-induced ischemia and resting left ventricular ejection fraction during follow-up. RESULTS: During a mean (SD) follow-up of 10.2 (2.6) years, 27 major adverse cardiac events occurred in the PCI group and 67 events occurred in the anti-ischemic drug therapy group (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.55; P<.001), which corresponds to an absolute event reduction of 6.3% per year (95% confidence interval, 3.7%-8.9%; P<.001). Patients in the PCI group had lower rates of ischemia (11.6% vs 28.9% in patients in the drug therapy group at final follow-up; P = .03) despite fewer drugs. Left ventricular ejection fraction remained preserved in PCI patients (mean [SD] of 53.9% [9.9%] at baseline to 55.6% [8.1%] at final follow-up) and decreased significantly (P<.001) in drug therapy patients (mean [SD] of 59.7% [11.8%] at baseline to 48.8% [7.9%] at final follow-up). CONCLUSION: Among patients with recent MI, silent myocardial ischemia verified by stress imaging, and 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease, PCI compared with anti-ischemic drug therapy reduced the long-term risk of major cardiac events. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00387231.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Schoenenberger, Andreas

ISSN:

0098-7484

ISBN:

17488963

Publisher:

American Medical Association

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:54

Last Modified:

02 Aug 2016 15:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1001/jama.297.18.1985

PubMed ID:

17488963

Web of Science ID:

000246301800020

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.22780

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/22780 (FactScience: 36564)

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