The significance of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of periodic leg movements in sleep

Guggisberg, Adrian G; Hess, Christian W; Mathis, Johannes (2007). The significance of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of periodic leg movements in sleep. Sleep, 30(6), pp. 755-66. Darien, Ill.: American Academy of Sleep Medicine

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STUDY OBJECTIVES: Periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) are frequently accompanied by arousals and autonomic activation, but the pathophysiologic significance of these manifestations is unclear. DESIGN: Changes in heart rate variability (HRV), HRV spectra, and electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra associated with idiopathic PLMS were compared with changes associated with isolated leg movements and respiratory-related leg movements during sleep. Furthermore, correlations between electromyographic activity, HRV changes, and EEG changes were assessed. SETTING: Sleep laboratory. PATIENTS: Whole-night polysomnographic studies of 24 subjects fulfilling the criteria of either periodic leg movements disorder (n = 8), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (n = 7), or normal polysomnography (n = 9) were used. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Spectral HRV changes started before all EEG changes and up to 6 seconds before the onset of all types of leg movements. An initial weak autonomic activation was followed by a sympathetic activation, an increase of EEG delta activity, and finally a progression to increased higher-frequency EEG rhythms. After movement onset, HRV indicated a vagal activation, and, the EEG, a decrease in spindle activity. Sympathetic activation, as measured by HRV spectra, was greater for PLMS than for all other movement types. In EEG, gamma synchronization began 1 to 2 seconds earlier for isolated leg movements and respiratory-related leg movements than for PLMS. Significant correlations were found between autonomic activations and electromyographic activity, as well as between autonomic activations and EEG delta activity, but not between higher-frequency EEG rhythms and EMG activity or HRV changes. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a primary role of the sympathetic nervous system in the generation of PLMS.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Guggisberg, Adrian; Hess, Christian Walter and Mathis, Johannes

ISSN:

0161-8105

ISBN:

17580597

Publisher:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:55

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:16

PubMed ID:

17580597

Web of Science ID:

000247321400010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23307 (FactScience: 41239)

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