Cell-type specific alterations of cortical interneurons in schizophrenic patients

Kalus, Peter; Bondzio, Julia; Federspiel, Andrea; Müller, Thomas J; Zuschratter, Werner (2002). Cell-type specific alterations of cortical interneurons in schizophrenic patients. NeuroReport, 13(5), pp. 713-717. London: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1097/00001756-200204160-00035

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In the human brain, cortical GABAergic interneurons represent an important population of local circuit neurons responsible for the intrinsic modulation of neuronal information and have been supposed to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We conducted a quantitative study on the differentiated three-dimensional morphological structure of two types of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of schizophrenic patients versus controls. While type A interneurons ('small bipolar cells') showed a significant reduction of their soma size in schizophrenics, type B interneurons ('small multipolar cells') of schizophrenic patients exhibited a marked decrease in the extent of their dendritic system. These results further support the assumption of a considerable significance of the ACC, an important limbic relay centre, for the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenic psychoses.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Federspiel, Andrea

ISSN:

0959-4965

ISBN:

11973476

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:55

Last Modified:

19 Feb 2014 22:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1097/00001756-200204160-00035

PubMed ID:

11973476

Web of Science ID:

000174971900031

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23323 (FactScience: 41293)

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