An fMRI-study of locally oriented perception in autism: altered early visual processing of the block design test

Bölte, S; Hubl, D; Dierks, T; Holtmann, M; Poustka, F (2008). An fMRI-study of locally oriented perception in autism: altered early visual processing of the block design test. Journal of neural transmission, 115(3), pp. 545-52. Wien: Springer 10.1007/s00702-007-0850-1

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Autism has been associated with enhanced local processing on visual tasks. Originally, this was based on findings that individuals with autism exhibited peak performance on the block design test (BDT) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. In autism, the neurofunctional correlates of local bias on this test have not yet been established, although there is evidence of alterations in the early visual cortex. Functional MRI was used to analyze hemodynamic responses in the striate and extrastriate visual cortex during BDT performance and a color counting control task in subjects with autism compared to healthy controls. In autism, BDT processing was accompanied by low blood oxygenation level-dependent signal changes in the right ventral quadrant of V2. Findings indicate that, in autism, locally oriented processing of the BDT is associated with altered responses of angle and grating-selective neurons, that contribute to shape representation, figure-ground, and gestalt organization. The findings favor a low-level explanation of BDT performance in autism.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > UPD Murtenstrasse
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Psychiatric Neurophysiology (discontinued)

UniBE Contributor:

Hubl, Daniela and Dierks, Thomas

ISSN:

0300-9564

ISBN:

18301959

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:55

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00702-007-0850-1

PubMed ID:

18301959

Web of Science ID:

000253995700018

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23461 (FactScience: 41902)

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