Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in mountain bikers

Vibert, Dominique; Redfield, Robin C; Häusler, Rudolf (2007). Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in mountain bikers. Annals of otology, rhinology & laryngology, 116(12), pp. 887-90. St. Louis, Mo.: Annals Pub. Co.

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

We evaluated 4 men who had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) that occured several hours after intensive mountain biking but without head trauma. The positional maneuvers in the planes of the posterior and horizontal canals elicited BPPV, as well as transitory nystagmus. This was attributed to both the posterior and horizontal semicircular canals (SCCs) on the left side in 1 patient, in these 2 SCCs on the right side in another patient, and to the right posterior SCC in the other 2 patients. The symptoms disappeared after physiotherapeutic maneuvers in 2 patients and spontaneously in the other 2 patients. Cross-country or downhill mountain biking generates frequent vibratory impacts, which are only partially filtered through the suspension fork and the upper parts of the body. Biomechanically, during a moderate jump, before landing, the head is subjected to an acceleration close to negative 1 g, and during impact it is subjected to an upward acceleration of more than 2g. Repeated acceleration-deceleration events during intensive off-road biking might generate displacement and/or dislocation of otoconia from the otolithic organs, inducing the typical symptoms of BPPV. This new cause of posttraumatic BPPV should be considered as an injury of minor severity attributed to the practice of mountain biking.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders (ENT)

UniBE Contributor:

Vibert-Mennet, Dominique

ISSN:

0003-4894

ISBN:

18217506

Publisher:

Annals Pub. Co.

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:55

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:16

PubMed ID:

18217506

Web of Science ID:

000251825000005

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23645 (FactScience: 43255)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback