Pneumococcal meningitis induces apoptosis in recently postmitotic immature neurons in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats

Grandgirard, D; Bifrare, Y-D; Pleasure, S J; Kummer, J; Leib, Stephen L.; Tauber, Martin G. (2007). Pneumococcal meningitis induces apoptosis in recently postmitotic immature neurons in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats. Developmental neuroscience, 29(1-2), pp. 134-142. Basel: Karger 10.1159/000096218

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Bacterial meningitis is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, despite advances in antibiotic therapy. Meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with a particularly high incidence of neurological sequelae including deficits resulting from damage to the hippocampus. Previous studies have documented that in neonatal rats with experimental pneumococcal meningitis, cells in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus undergo apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to define in more detail the nature of the dying cells in the dentate gyrus. Using bromodeoxyuridine labeling at different times before infection combined with immunocytochemistry, we identified the vulnerable cells as those which underwent mitosis 6-10 days before infection. A majority of these cells are of neuronal lineage. Thus, immature neuronal cells several days after the last cell division are preferentially triggered into apoptosis during pneumococcal meningitis. The loss of these cells may contribute to the long-lasting impairment of hippocampal function identified in animal models and in humans after bacterial meningitis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Leib, Stephen and Täuber, Martin G.

ISSN:

0378-5866

ISBN:

17148956

Publisher:

Karger

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:56

Last Modified:

05 Aug 2014 15:04

Publisher DOI:

10.1159/000096218

PubMed ID:

17148956

Web of Science ID:

000242617100013

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23932 (FactScience: 45269)

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