In vitro expression of the first capsule gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae, cpsA, is associated with serotype-specific colonization prevalence and invasiveness

Hathaway, Lucy J; Bättig, Patrick; Mühlemann, Kathrin (2007). In vitro expression of the first capsule gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae, cpsA, is associated with serotype-specific colonization prevalence and invasiveness. Microbiology, 153(Pt 8), pp. 2465-71. Reading, UK: Society for General Microbiology 10.1099/mic.0.2006/005066-0

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The polysaccharide capsule protects Streptococcus pneumoniae from phagocytosis during invasive infection, but inhibits adherence. Serotypes vary in their tendency to colonize the nasopharynx or cause invasive infection, and differences in capsule expression may play a role. Expression of the first gene of the capsule operon, cpsA, during in vitro growth of 43 clinical isolates representing 14 common pneumococcal serotypes was compared using quantitative RT-PCR. Serotypes associated with invasive infection (1, 4, 5, 7F, 8 and 14) expressed an average of twofold (P=0.0003) more cpsA than serotypes associated with nasopharyngeal colonization (6A, 6B, 9V, 15, 18C, 19F, 23F and 33). There was no difference in cpsA expression in response to growth under environmental oxygen or anaerobic conditions between the invasive and colonizing transparent strains tested: oxygen concentration did not affect cpsA expression in either the invasive or the colonizing transparent strains. Expression of cpsA at OD(600) 0.6 tended to be greater in strains with a longer lag phase during in vitro growth (P=0.07). Therefore, cpsA expression under ambient oxygen concentrations correlates with serotype-specific invasiveness and is inversely associated with the prevalence of serotype-specific carriage.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Mühlemann, Kathrin

ISSN:

1350-0872

ISBN:

17660411

Publisher:

Society for General Microbiology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:56

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1099/mic.0.2006/005066-0

PubMed ID:

17660411

Web of Science ID:

000249044900010

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/23938 (FactScience: 45283)

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