Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging in small rodents using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner

Inderbitzin, Daniel; Stoupis, Christoforos; Sidler, Daniel; Gass, Markus; Candinas, Daniel (2007). Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging in small rodents using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner. Methods, 43(1), pp. 46-53. San Diego, Calif.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.ymeth.2007.03.010

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Because of superior soft-tissue contrast compared to other imaging techniques, non-invasive abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideal for monitoring organ regeneration, tissue repair, cancer stage, and treatment effects in a wide variety of experimental animal models. Currently, sophisticated MR protocols, including technically demanding procedures for motion artefact compensation, achieve an MRI resolution limit of < 100 microm under ideal conditions. However, such a high spatial resolution is not required for most experimental rodent studies. This article describes both a detailed imaging protocol for MR data acquisition in a ubiquitously and commercially available 1.5 T MR unit and 3-dimensional volumetry of organs, tissue components, or tumors. Future developments in MR technology will allow in vivo investigation of physiological and pathological processes at the cellular and even the molecular levels. Experimental MRI is crucial for non-invasive monitoring of a broad range of biological processes and will further our general understanding of physiology and disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Inderbitzin, Daniel and Candinas, Daniel

ISSN:

1046-2023

ISBN:

17720563

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:57

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ymeth.2007.03.010

PubMed ID:

17720563

Web of Science ID:

000249886100007

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/24220 (FactScience: 47678)

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