Epidemiology of candidemia in Swiss tertiary care hospitals: secular trends, 1991-2000

Marchetti, O; Bille, J; Fluckiger, U; Eggimann, P; Ruef, C; Garbino, J; Calandra, T; Glauser, MP; Täuber, MG; Pittet, D; Fungal, Infection Network of Switzerland (2004). Epidemiology of candidemia in Swiss tertiary care hospitals: secular trends, 1991-2000. Clinical infectious diseases, 38(3), pp. 311-20. Cary, N.C.: The University of Chicago Press 10.1086/380637

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Candida species are among the most common bloodstream pathogens in the United States, where the emergence of azole-resistant Candida glabrata and Candida krusei are major concerns. Recent comprehensive longitudinal data from Europe are lacking. We conducted a nationwide survey of candidemia during 1991-2000 in 17 university and university-affiliated hospitals representing 79% of all tertiary care hospital beds in Switzerland. The number of transplantations and bloodstream infections increased significantly (P<.001). A total of 1137 episodes of candidemia were observed: Candida species ranked seventh among etiologic agents (2.9% of all bloodstream isolates). The incidence of candidemia was stable over a 10-year period. C. albicans remained the predominant Candida species recovered (66%), followed by C. glabrata (15%). Candida tropicalis emerged (9%), the incidence of Candida parapsilosis decreased (1%), and recovery of C. krusei remained rare (2%). Fluconazole consumption increased significantly (P<.001). Despite increasing high-risk activities, the incidence of candidemia remained unchanged, and no shift to resistant species occurred.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Täuber, Martin G.

ISSN:

1058-4838

ISBN:

14727199

Publisher:

The University of Chicago Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:00

Last Modified:

04 Nov 2019 10:43

Publisher DOI:

10.1086/380637

PubMed ID:

14727199

Web of Science ID:

000188207600001

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.25720

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/25720 (FactScience: 60806)

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