Inducible nitric oxide synthase and the effect of aminoguanidine in experimental neonatal meningitis

Leib, Stephen L.; Kim, Young S.; Black, Stephen M.; Tureen, Jay H.; Täuber, Martin G. (1998). Inducible nitric oxide synthase and the effect of aminoguanidine in experimental neonatal meningitis. Journal of infectious diseases, 177(3), pp. 692-700. Cary, N.C.: Oxford University Press 10.1086/514226

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This study explored the role of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) in an infant rat model of group B streptococcal meningitis. Brain iNOS activity increased during meningitis (P < .001), and iNOS was detected by immunocytochemistry in the walls of meningeal vessels and cells of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation. Animals treated with iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG; 130 mg/kg every 8 h) had reduced NO production (P < .05), higher CSF bacterial titers (P < .05), and increased incidence of seizures (P < .01) compared with untreated infected animals. AG also increased areas of severe hypoperfusion in the cortex (31% +/- 14% in controls vs. 56% +/- 16% in AG; P < .01) and the extent of cortical neuronal injury, both when administered at the time of infection (P < .05) and in established meningitis (P < .02). Thus, NO produced by iNOS may be beneficial in this model of experimental meningitis by reducing cerebral ischemia.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Leib, Stephen and Täuber, Martin G.

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0022-1899

ISBN:

9498449

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:00

Last Modified:

07 Jul 2015 14:59

Publisher DOI:

10.1086/514226

PubMed ID:

9498449

Web of Science ID:

000072159900023

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.25768

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/25768 (FactScience: 60905)

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