Effect of hydration status on cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in rabbits with experimental meningitis

Tureen, JH; Täuber, MG; Sande, MA (1992). Effect of hydration status on cerebral blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Journal of clinical investigation, 89(3), pp. 947-53. Ann Arbor, Mich.: American Society for Clinical Investigation 10.1172/JCI115676

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The effects of hydration status on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and development of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactic acidosis were evaluated in rabbits with experimental pneumococcal meningitis. As loss of cerebrovascular autoregulation has been previously demonstrated in this model, we reasoned that compromise of intravascular volume might severely affect cerebral perfusion. Furthermore, as acute exacerbation of the inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space has been observed after antibiotic therapy, animals were studied not only while meningitis evolved, but also 4-6 h after treatment with antibiotics to determine whether there would also be an effect on CBF. To produce different levels of hydration, animals were given either 50 ml/kg per 24 h of normal saline ("low fluid") or 150 ml/kg 24 h ("high fluid"). After 16 h of infection, rabbits that were given the lower fluid regimen had lower mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), lower CBF, and higher CSF lactate compared with animals that received the higher fluid regimen. In the first 4-6 h after antibiotic administration, low fluid rabbits had a significant decrease in MABP and CBF compared with, and a significantly greater increase in CSF lactate concentration than, high fluid rabbits. This study suggests that intravascular volume status may be a critical variable in determining CBF and therefore the degree of cerebral ischemia in meningitis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute for Infectious Diseases

UniBE Contributor:

Täuber, Martin G.

ISSN:

0021-9738

ISBN:

1541682

Publisher:

American Society for Clinical Investigation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:00

Last Modified:

22 Jul 2015 10:14

Publisher DOI:

10.1172/JCI115676

PubMed ID:

1541682

Web of Science ID:

A1992HH51300030

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.25798

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/25798 (FactScience: 60966)

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