Rapid adaptation of visual search in simulated hemianopia

Simpson, Sara Ann; Abegg, Mathias; Barton, Jason J S (2011). Rapid adaptation of visual search in simulated hemianopia. Cerebral cortex, 21(7), pp. 1593-1601. Oxford University Press 10.1093/cercor/bhq221

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Patients with homonymous hemianopia have altered visual search patterns, but it is unclear how rapidly this develops and whether it reflects a strategic adaptation to altered perception or plastic changes to tissue damage. To study the temporal dynamics of adaptation alone, we used a gaze-contingent display to simulate left or right hemianopia in 10 healthy individuals as they performed 25 visual search trials. Visual search was slower and less accurate in hemianopic than in full-field viewing. With full-field viewing, there were improvements in search speed, fixation density, and number of fixations over the first 9 trials, then stable performance. With hemianopic viewing, there was a rapid shift of fixation into the blind field over the first 5-7 trials, followed by continuing gradual improvements in completion time, number of fixations, and fixation density over all 25 trials. We conclude that in the first minutes after onset of hemianopia, there is a biphasic pattern of adaptation to altered perception: an early rapid qualitative change that shifts visual search into the blind side, followed by more gradual gains in the efficiency of using this new strategy, a pattern that has parallels in other studies of motor learning.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ophthalmology

UniBE Contributor:

Abegg, Mathias

ISSN:

1047-3211

Publisher:

Oxford University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Mathias Abegg

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:12

Last Modified:

27 Apr 2018 09:14

Publisher DOI:

10.1093/cercor/bhq221

PubMed ID:

21084455

Web of Science ID:

000291750400011

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.2642

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/2642 (FactScience: 205487)

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