Time course of biological activity in fresh murine osteochondral allografts paralleled to the recipient's immune response

Fraitzl, Christian R; Egli, Rainer J; Wingenfeld, Carsten; Ganz, Reinhold; Hofstetter, Willy; Leunig, Michael (2008). Time course of biological activity in fresh murine osteochondral allografts paralleled to the recipient's immune response. Journal of investigative surgery, 21(3), pp. 109-17. New York, N.Y.: Taylor & Francis 10.1080/08941930802043540

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The use of fresh osteochondral allografts is a popular approach to treat articular cartilage lesions. Immunological reactions of the recipient elicited by the allograft's osseous portion, however, frequently result in their deterioration. So far, little emphasis has been put on describing morphology and biological activity in fresh allografts and paralleling these to the immunological processes triggered in the host. Therefore, in the present study murine neonatal femora, serving as osteochondral grafts, were transplanted as fresh isografts (controls) or allografts (the latter in non- or presensitized mice) and retrieved after 2, 5, 10, and 20 days. It was shown that (1) in isografts active bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts) were present, the bone marrow was repopulated with hematopoietic cells, the diaphysis increased in length, and no specific immunological reaction by the recipient was evoked. (2) Allografts transplanted into nonsensitized hosts initially appeared similar as isografts, but activated T lymphocytes at the transplantation site preceded loss of active bone cells within the graft and development of fibrosis within the marrow cavity. (3) In allografts transplanted into presensitized recipients, severe deterioration of the graft was observed with very few active bone cells, accompanied by an invasion of T lymphocytes and fibrosis in the marrow cavity already in early stages. Similar to vital organ transplantation, the function of cells within osteochondral allografts is severely impaired after being recognized by the immune system. Therefore, emphasis has to be placed on the development of procedures preserving cartilage biology while reducing the antigenicity of the allograft's osseous portion.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung

UniBE Contributor:

Egli, Roger and Hofstetter, Willy

ISSN:

0894-1939

ISBN:

18569430

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:01

Last Modified:

23 Jan 2018 12:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/08941930802043540

PubMed ID:

18569430

Web of Science ID:

000256486200004

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/26673 (FactScience: 81116)

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