Hypoxic expansion promotes the chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes

Egli, Rainer J; Bastian, Johannes D; Ganz, Reinhold; Hofstetter, Willy; Leunig, Michael (2008). Hypoxic expansion promotes the chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes. Journal of orthopaedic research, 26(7), pp. 977-85. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley 10.1002/jor.20603

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For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, an ex vivo expansion phase is required to obtain sufficient numbers of cells needed for therapy. Although recent reports demonstrated the central role of oxygen for the function and differentiation of chondrocytes, a beneficial effect of low oxygen concentrations during the expansion of the cells to further improve their chondrogenic capacity has not been investigated.Therefore, freshly harvested bovine articular chondrocytes were grown in two-dimensional monolayer cultures at 1.5% and 21% O2 and redifferentiation was subsequently induced in three-dimensional micromass cultures at 1.5%, 5%, and 21% O2. Cells expanded at 1.5% O2 were characterized by low citrate synthase (aerobic energy metabolism)--and high LDH (anaerobic energy metabolism-activities,suggesting an anaerobic energy metabolism. Collagen type II mRNA was twofold higher in cells expanded at 1.5% as compared to expansion at 21% O2. Micromass cultures grown at 21% O2 showed up to a twofold increase in the tissue content of glycosaminoglycans when formed with cells expanded at 1.5% instead of 21% O2. However, no differences in the levels of transcripts and in the staining for collagen type II protein were observed in these micromass cultures. Hypoxia (1.5% and 5% O2) applied during micromass cultures gave rise to tissues with low contents of glycosaminoglycans only. In vivo, the chondrocytes are adapted to a hypoxic environment. Taking this into account, by applying 1.5% O2 in the expansion phase in the course of cell-based cartilage repair strategies, may result in a repair tissue with higher quality by increasing the content of glycosaminoglycans.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic and Policlinic for Anaesthesiology and Pain Therapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung

UniBE Contributor:

Egli, Roger and Hofstetter, Willy

ISSN:

0736-0266

ISBN:

18302236

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Jeannie Wurz

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:01

Last Modified:

23 Jan 2018 12:17

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/jor.20603

PubMed ID:

18302236

Web of Science ID:

000256744600013

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/26676 (FactScience: 81123)

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