[Complications during and after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. Impact of patient related and anatomical factors]

Voegelin, Thomas C; Suter, Valérie G A; Bornstein, Michael M (2008). [Complications during and after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. Impact of patient related and anatomical factors]. Schweizerische Monatsschrift für Zahnmedizin, 118(3), pp. 192-8. Bern: Schweizerische Zahnärzte-Gesellschaft

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The estimation of possible intra- and postoperative complications for surgical removal of third molars in the mandible poses a frequent dilemma in oral surgery. In the present study, the influence of the patient's age and gender, a reduced mouth opening, and the anatomical position of the tooth in the mandible on intra- and postoperative complications were evaluated. In a total of 120 surgically removed third molars, 9.2% intraoperative complications occurred, mainly bleeding. Factors influencing the risk for intraoperative complications were a male patient, a reduced mouth opening, and distally angulated teeth. Postoperative complications were encountered in 6.7%, mainly dry sockets. For this group, a female gender, a higher age, and distally angulated teeth were identified as risk parameters. As most of the patient- and anatomy-related factors are set parameters when evaluating possible risk factors for third molar surgery, only the timepoint of surgery can be influenced by the surgeon. Regarding the increase in intra- and postoperative complications for third molar removal in higher age groups, the prophylactic third molar surgery between the age of 18 and 25 seems justified.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology

UniBE Contributor:

Voegelin, Thomas Christophe; Suter, Valérie and Bornstein, Michael

ISSN:

0256-2855

Publisher:

Schweizerische Zahnärzte-Gesellschaft

Language:

English

Submitter:

Eveline Carmen Schuler

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:02

Last Modified:

25 Jan 2017 12:17

PubMed ID:

18422055

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/26759 (FactScience: 87931)

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