Cardiomegaly in a premature neonate after venous umbilical catheterization

Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Nelle, Mathias; McDougall, Felicity Jane (2009). Cardiomegaly in a premature neonate after venous umbilical catheterization. European journal of pediatrics, 168(1), pp. 107-9. Berlin: Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00431-008-0704-3

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Umbilical venous catheters allow rapid central access in neonates, but may be associated with various complications. We present a case of a newborn with pericardial effusion following umbilical venous catheterization. An extremely low birth weight infant was intubated for respiratory distress syndrome and had umbilical venous and arterial lines in place. Massive cardiomegaly was noted on the subsequent chest X-ray. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion without signs of tamponade. After removing the catheter, the effusion gradually resolved. While pericardial effusion is a well-known complication of percutaneous long central lines, only a few case reports have documented sudden cardiovascular compromise associated with umbilical venous catheters. Pericardial effusion may be asymptomatic and should be suspected in infants with central catheters and progressive cardiomegaly. The prompt removal of catheters and, if signs of cardiac tamponade are present, emergency pericardiocentesis may prove to be life-saving.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Nelle, Mathias and McDougall Müller, Felicity Jane

ISSN:

0340-6199

ISBN:

18379819

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:03

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 20:44

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00431-008-0704-3

PubMed ID:

18379819

Web of Science ID:

000261178200018

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.27216

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/27216 (FactScience: 105052)

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