Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and myosin heavy polypeptide gene products in degenerating rotator cuff muscles

Fuchs, B; Zumstein, M; Regenfelder, F; Steinmann, P; Fuchs, T; Husmann, K; Hellermann, J; Jost, B; Hodler, J; Born, W; Gerber, C (2008). Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and myosin heavy polypeptide gene products in degenerating rotator cuff muscles. Journal of orthopaedic research, 26(7), pp. 1007-11. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley 10.1002/jor.20577

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Impaired function of shoulder muscles, resulting from rotator cuff tears, is associated with abnormal deposition of fat in muscle tissue, but corresponding cellular and molecular mechanisms, likely reflected by altered gene expression profiles, are largely unknown. Here, an analysis of muscle gene expression was carried out by semiquantitative RT-PCR in total RNA extracts of supraspinatus biopsies collected from 60 patients prior to shoulder surgery. A significant increase of alpha-skeletal muscle actin (p = 0.0115) and of myosin heavy polypeptide 1 (p = 0.0147) gene transcripts was observed in parallel with progressive fat deposition in the muscle, assessed on parasagittal T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo magnetic resonance images according to Goutallier. Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and of myosin heavy polypeptide-1 has been reported to be associated with increased muscle tissue metabolism and oxidative stress. The findings of the present study, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that increased fat deposition in rotator cuff muscle after injury reflects muscle degeneration.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Orthopaedic Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Zumstein, Matthias

ISSN:

0736-0266

ISBN:

18327800

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:03

Last Modified:

04 May 2014 23:19

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/jor.20577

PubMed ID:

18327800

Web of Science ID:

000256744600017

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/27488 (FactScience: 107883)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback