RISK OF SHUNT-DEPENDENT HYDROCEPHALUS AFTER OCCLUSION OF RUPTURED INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS BY SURGICAL CLIPPING OR ENDOVASCULAR COILING: A SINGLE-INSTITUTION SERIES AND META-ANALYSIS

de Oliveira, Jean; Beck, Jürgen; Setzer, Matthias; Gerlach, Rüdiger; Vatter, Hartmut; Seifert, Volker; Raabe, Andreas (2008). RISK OF SHUNT-DEPENDENT HYDROCEPHALUS AFTER OCCLUSION OF RUPTURED INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS BY SURGICAL CLIPPING OR ENDOVASCULAR COILING: A SINGLE-INSTITUTION SERIES AND META-ANALYSIS. Neurosurgery Hagerstown, Md.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 10.1227/01.NEU.0000280090.83866.26

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OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus after treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms by clipping versus coiling. METHODS: We analyzed 596 patients prospectively added to our database from July of 1999 to November of 2005 concerning the risk of shunt dependency after clipping versus coiling. Factors analyzed included age; sex; Hunt and Hess grade; Fisher grade; acute hydrocephalus; intraventricular hemorrhage; angiographic vasospasm; and number, size, and location of aneurysms. In addition, a meta-analysis of available data from the literature was performed identifying four studies with quantitative data on the frequency of clip, coil, and shunt dependency. RESULTS: The institutional series revealed Hunt and Hess grade, Fisher grade, acute hydrocephalus, intraventricular hemorrhage, and angiographic vasospasm as significant (P < 0.05) risk factors for shunt dependency after a univariate analysis. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, we isolated intraventricular hemorrhage, acute hydrocephalus, and angiographic vasospasm as independent, significant risk factors for shunt dependency. The meta-analysis, including the current data, revealed a significantly higher risk for shunt dependency after coiling than after clipping (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Clipping of a ruptured aneurysm may be associated with a lower risk for developing shunt dependency, possibly by clot removal. This might influence long-term outcome and surgical decision making.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurosurgery

UniBE Contributor:

Beck, Jürgen and Raabe, Andreas

ISSN:

0148-396X

ISBN:

18827727

Publisher:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:04

Last Modified:

06 Dec 2013 13:53

Publisher DOI:

10.1227/01.NEU.0000280090.83866.26

PubMed ID:

18827727

Web of Science ID:

000251617500008

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/27663 (FactScience: 109866)

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