Minimally invasive strabismus surgery (MISS) for inferior obliquus recession

Mojon, Daniel Stéphane (2009). Minimally invasive strabismus surgery (MISS) for inferior obliquus recession. Graefe's archive for clinical and experimental ophthalmology, 247(2), pp. 261-265. Berlin: Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00417-008-0972-7

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PURPOSE: To present a novel, minimally invasive strabismus surgery (MISS) technique for inferior obliquus recessions. METHODS: Graded MISS inferior obliquus recessions were performed in 20 eyes of 15 patients by applying two small conjunctival cuts, one at the insertion of inferior obliquus and another where the scleral anchoring of the muscle occurred. RESULTS: The amount of recession was 12.2 +/- 2.3 mm (range 6 to 14 mm). The vertical deviation, which was measured in 25 degrees of adduction, decreased from preoperatively 12.8 degrees +/- 5.6 degrees to 2.7 degrees +/- 2.2 degrees (p < 0.0001) at 6 months. LogMAR visual acuity was preoperatively -0.10 +/- 0.17 and at 6 months -0.14 +/- 0.22 (p > 0.1). In one eye (2.5%) the two cuts had to be joined because of excessive bleeding. Binocular vision improved in eight patients, remained unchanged in six patients, and decreased from 30 to 60 arcsec in one patient (p > 0.1). Conjunctival and lid swelling were hardly visible on the first postoperative day in primary gaze position in 10/20 (50%) of eyes. Five of the eyes (25%) had mild and five (25%) moderate visibility of surgery. One patient out of 15 (7%) needed repeat surgery because of insufficient reduction of the sursoadduction within the first 6 months. The dose-effect relationship 6 months postoperatively for an accommodative near target at 25 degrees adduction was 0.83 degrees +/- 0.43 degrees per mm of recession. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that small-incision, minimal dissection inferior obliquus graded recessions are feasible and effective to improve ocular alignment in patients with strabismus sursoadductorius.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Ophthalmology

UniBE Contributor:

Mojon, Daniel Stéphane

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0721-832X

ISBN:

18958486

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 15:05

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 18:18

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00417-008-0972-7

PubMed ID:

18958486

Web of Science ID:

000261750700014

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.28226

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/28226 (FactScience: 118899)

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